Overtraining: Disorder Caused by the Obsession With the Body

Everything in excess is bad, they said our mothers. It is a fact that the valley, even to healthy habits, such as the practice of physical activities. Training excessive can trigger risk to the body, such as muscle injuries, and something much more serious: a disorder of the image called overtraining.

Overtraining Disorder Caused by the Obsession With the Body

According to psychotherapist Maura Albano, this is a mental health problem related with the distortion of body image. “The main disorder that characterized the overtraining is excessive training, in the quest for a perfect body accompanied by a low self-esteem,” he explains.

Recently, the overtraining has been included in the manual of psychiatry, american, and classified as a subtype of the Disorder Dismórfico Body (TDC). The term dysmorphia is the difference between what the person sees about their body image and what she really is. “What happens in this disease is that the patient never sees themselves as muscular enough. In the quest to achieve this goal, passes the train too much, even though it bring pain and other types of sufferings,” says Maura.

The psychotherapist emphasizes that other symptoms characteristic of this disorder, such as modifications of concern in the diet, in addition to the tendency to self medicate, to supplement the power supply and make use of anabolic steroids. “Another typical feature of this problem is the resistance to the social activities, because people with this frame tend to flee from situations in which the body may be exposed”, he adds.

Features of overtraining

An example of the most common and widespread of Disorder Dismórfico Body is anorexia. In this type of the disease, the person believes that it is never thin enough, even the mirror showing the opposite of this. In the case of overtraining patients, they believe that they are never muscular enough.

Some studies show that overtraining is more present among men. It is estimated, for example, that one in every ten men who attend gyms in Uk suffers from this problem. Studies published in the Medicine Magazine show that about one million americans between the nine millions of fans of bodybuilding may suffer from this disorder.

To Maura Albano, in recent times, overtraining has reached a larger number of people, very influenced by the aesthetic standards set forth by the media, especially with the use each more intense time of social networks to share a life-style fitness. Another common characteristic among a large part of the overtraining patients is the fact that they are people shy and low self-esteem, who seek in the idea of the perfect body a kind of compensation for feelings of inferiority social.“There are still athletes who participate in competitions and find themselves increasingly obsessed with the results, they are always better and stronger,” he says.

Consequences of overtraining

The overtraining that is caused by this disorder results in aesthetic problems, such as the disproportionality of the body and excess weight. But other more serious consequences are likely to be caused by this disease, especially when linked to steroid use:

  • Risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Muscle injuries and liver
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Increased risk of prostate cancer
  • OCD (Obsessive Compulsive disorder)
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Lack of sexual drive
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Infertility in women
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts

Treatment for overtraining

One of the major problems of these disorders dismórficos is the difficulty of the patient to see how patient and to admit the need of help. Therefore, it is more than crucial the support of family and close friends, alongside psychological treatments special.

It is still important to follow-up of nutritionists to be suggested a balanced diet, that fill the body with all the nutrients and vitamins it requires to recover.

It may also be necessary to use medications to control depression, anxiety, OCD, and other issues that the disease raises.

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